Alumni Spotlight: Jeanne Drewes, MLIS (‘86)

Posted:

Photo of Jeanne Drewes, Chief of Binding and Collections Care Division, in the Adams Building, Feb. 27, 2015. Photo by Shawn Miller —  American Library Association (ALA).

Jeanne Drewes, Chief of Binding and Collections Care Division, in the Adams Building, Feb. 27, 2015. Photo by Shawn Miller — American Library Association (ALA).

Jeanne Drewes, chief of the Binding & Collections Care Division and the Deacidification Program at the Library of Congress, is a 1986 alumna of the MU School of Information Science & Learning Technologies.

While matriculating through the library and information science program, Drewes wanted to specialize in preservation. She chose a preservation-related topic for her thesis and did a directed study with, then head of special collections, Margaret Howell.

In March, Drewes received the 2017 recipient of the Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS).

Below, she shares with us why she chose to attend SISLT, the impact her program had on her life (including career), and advice for prospective students:

Why did you select to attend SISLT?

I received my undergraduate degree in english from the University of Missouri — Kansas City, and wanted to stay in the state while furthering my education.

How did your program(s) at SISLT impact your career?

Getting my Master of Library Science, as it was then called, enabled me to move from a staff position into professional position. This advanced my career to what my daughter calls the “mothership” — the Library of Congress.

What did you appreciate most about your experience at SISLT?

I have wonderful memories of being a graduate assistant and teaching a one-hour course on library skills. This experience laid the groundwork for my future teaching. Of course, I learned a great deal from my coursework and professors, as well.

What impact has SISLT had on your life?

I still have friends from Mizzou and found connections with other colleagues who either graduated or worked at the university. I say there are two degrees of separation and often find the Missouri connection to be one of those.

What advice would you give prospective SISLT students who are considering the LIS program?

Try out a lot of possibilities before determining a track and take advantage of the connections with graduates and professors to advance your career.